"Harlem" chegou na iTunes Store! [www.andremartins.com.br]

"Harlem" chegou na iTunes Store! [www.andremartins.com.br]

servant-of-fire:

FANTASTIC :OOOO

Game of Thrones Silhouettes - Created by Gato Lopez

(via libbelia)

oupacademic:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Happy Birthday, Oxford English Dictionary! (We love having Oxford as part of the family here on tumblr XOOOOO).


It was on this day in 1884 that the first part of the first edition of The Oxford English Dictionary was published. In those days, it had a much wordier name: A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society. Eventually,the title was simplified to The Oxford English Dictionary.
The dictionary had been conceived decades earlier by a group of London scholars who belonged to the Philological Society, an organization that studied language. They were disappointed in the quality of available dictionaries. They formed an “Unregistered Words Committee” to find words that were missing from dictionaries, and intended to create a dictionary of those words. As they did their research, they came up with a list of seven major issues they found in existing dictionaries, issues like “history of obsolete senses of words often omitted,” “inadequate distinction among synonyms,” and “insufficient use of good illustrative quotations” — all areas in which the Oxford English Dictionary would eventually excel.
The London committee found so many missing words that they realized a book of those words would be much longer than the dictionaries that already existed. So they expanded their vision and opted to create a new, definitive dictionary. It would address all seven areas where they found modern dictionaries lacking, and would include a comprehensive list of words from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day. In 1858, the Philological Society officially approved the project.
The first editor died of tuberculosis after a year. The next editor became obsessed with finding examples of word usages in literature, and since many old texts were out of print, he started a press just to publish historical texts. He published a lot of books and recruited more than 800 volunteers to read through those books and others for quotations. Unfortunately, this process took 20 years, without any progress made on the dictionary itself. In 1878, the Oxford University Press agreed to take on the project, and it was assigned to yet another editor.
This new editor, James Murray [pictured above], inherited thousands of slips of paper with quotations on them provided by readers. But he found that under the past editorship, readers tended to focus on obscure words; for example, readers had collected just five examples of the word abuse but more than 50 of the word abusion. Within a few weeks of being hired, Murray wrote and published a document called “An Appeal to the English-Speaking and English-Reading Public,” and had 2,000 copies distributed. He asked volunteers to read through whatever books they preferred — possibilities included works of literature, science, philosophy, historical texts, and cookbooks. When they found an interesting word, they should note it down on a 4”x6” index card with an example of the sentence in which it was used. Thousands of volunteer readers had submitted more than a million quotations by the time the first installment of the dictionary was published.
When the Oxford University Press took on the project, they estimated that the dictionary would be four volumes long, 6,400 pages, and take 10 years to complete. Five years after Murray took over as editor, on this day in 1884, the first edition was published — but it only covered from “A” to “Ant.” The project timeline was revised. Ultimately, the Oxford English Dictionary was 10 volumes long, 15,490 pages, and took 70 years. It was published in its final form in 1928.



Thank you! We love being here! :)

oupacademic:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Happy Birthday, Oxford English Dictionary! (We love having Oxford as part of the family here on tumblr XOOOOO).

It was on this day in 1884 that the first part of the first edition of The Oxford English Dictionary was published. In those days, it had a much wordier name: A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society. Eventually,the title was simplified to The Oxford English Dictionary.

The dictionary had been conceived decades earlier by a group of London scholars who belonged to the Philological Society, an organization that studied language. They were disappointed in the quality of available dictionaries. They formed an “Unregistered Words Committee” to find words that were missing from dictionaries, and intended to create a dictionary of those words. As they did their research, they came up with a list of seven major issues they found in existing dictionaries, issues like “history of obsolete senses of words often omitted,” “inadequate distinction among synonyms,” and “insufficient use of good illustrative quotations” — all areas in which the Oxford English Dictionary would eventually excel.

The London committee found so many missing words that they realized a book of those words would be much longer than the dictionaries that already existed. So they expanded their vision and opted to create a new, definitive dictionary. It would address all seven areas where they found modern dictionaries lacking, and would include a comprehensive list of words from Anglo-Saxon times to the present day. In 1858, the Philological Society officially approved the project.

The first editor died of tuberculosis after a year. The next editor became obsessed with finding examples of word usages in literature, and since many old texts were out of print, he started a press just to publish historical texts. He published a lot of books and recruited more than 800 volunteers to read through those books and others for quotations. Unfortunately, this process took 20 years, without any progress made on the dictionary itself. In 1878, the Oxford University Press agreed to take on the project, and it was assigned to yet another editor.

This new editor, James Murray [pictured above], inherited thousands of slips of paper with quotations on them provided by readers. But he found that under the past editorship, readers tended to focus on obscure words; for example, readers had collected just five examples of the word abuse but more than 50 of the word abusion. Within a few weeks of being hired, Murray wrote and published a document called “An Appeal to the English-Speaking and English-Reading Public,” and had 2,000 copies distributed. He asked volunteers to read through whatever books they preferred — possibilities included works of literature, science, philosophy, historical texts, and cookbooks. When they found an interesting word, they should note it down on a 4”x6” index card with an example of the sentence in which it was used. Thousands of volunteer readers had submitted more than a million quotations by the time the first installment of the dictionary was published.

When the Oxford University Press took on the project, they estimated that the dictionary would be four volumes long, 6,400 pages, and take 10 years to complete. Five years after Murray took over as editor, on this day in 1884, the first edition was published — but it only covered from “A” to “Ant.” The project timeline was revised. Ultimately, the Oxford English Dictionary was 10 volumes long, 15,490 pages, and took 70 years. It was published in its final form in 1928.

Thank you! We love being here! :)

lomographicsociety:

Photo of the Day by hodachrome
Find you inner peace with the calmness of our Photo of the Day. Hello, hodachrome and congratulations for having our Photo of the Day!

lomographicsociety:

Photo of the Day by hodachrome

Find you inner peace with the calmness of our Photo of the Day. Hello, hodachrome and congratulations for having our Photo of the Day!

isiope:

no. 2124 - Jonas Schmidt - www.isiope.com

isiope:

no. 2124 - Jonas Schmidt - www.isiope.com

"Os Ratos, os Restos e Ronaldo"

[publicado originalmente em março de 2009 - revista cover guitarra. imagem de PAUL KLEE]


 “Devemos julgar um homem mais pelas suas perguntas que pelas respostas”
Voltaire


Naziazeno é um dos personagens mais injustiçados da literatura brasileira. Grande responsável pelo ótimo enredo do livro “Os Ratos”, do escritor gaúcho Dyonélio Machado, Naziazeno representa o povo brasileiro, o mais humilde, simples, que compete com os ratos os fragmentos que restam no chão da grande festa pública que é o Brasil. A mulher de Naziazeno, um funcionário público endividado, lamenta que não há mais crédito para se comprar o leite, a manteiga, o pão e os remédios do filho pequeno. Cabisbaixo, Naziazeno tem 24 horas para tentar arrumar o dinheiro. Não há como se endividar mais, já quase todo o pouco que possuía encontra-se penhorado. Ele tenta um empréstimo com seu chefe, na repartição pública onde trabalha. Seu chefe nega na frente dos colegas. Ele sente vergonha no olhar das pessoas, sente-se humilhado, sente-se abandonado. Volta para casa derrotado. Não há nada a fazer. O livro transpira angústia. É simples e denso.

A ficção transborda realidade. Em pleno século XXI, o Brasil vive os rescaldos da imensa crise mundial originada e conduzida pelo sistema financeiro capitalista. Mas para uma parte dos brasileiros, a festança continua. Michel Temer e José Sarney caminham juntos para um passado que deveria ser enterrado muito abaixo de sete palmos de terra dura. Mas não. Ei-los aqui, dividindo a presidência da câmara dos deputados e do Senado, respectivamente. Ei-los aqui, juntos no mesmo partido que há anos maltrata este país, um partido que tem entre os seus Orestes Quércia. Ei-los, reunidos em uma simbiose que estremece os que acreditam na liberdade, na dignidade e no livre-pensar. Temer e Sarney, juntos, como líderes das duas casas políticas mais importantes do Brasil. Em pleno século XXI. Bem no meio do vendaval. 

A revista inglesa The Economist, em uma reportagem intitulada “Os Dinossauros ainda vagam”, chamou a eleição de José Sarney para o Senado Brasileiro como a “coroação do semi-feudalismo”. Quando eleito pela primeira vez ao mesmíssimo cargo, em 1995, Sarney disse que iria “lutar pela dignidade e pelas reformas tributária e política”. Isso foi a 14 anos atrás. Nada mudou. Sarney nada fez. E nada fará. Como disse um leitor do Estado de SP, “o papel onde está escrito o discurso da posse amarelou”. E Michel Temer, com sua lavada verborragia que vai do nada ao lugar nenhum? Acumula as presidências da Câmara dos Deputados e do PMDB. Promete ética, mudanças, dignidade e decência. Você já sabe exatamente o que irá acontecer. Nada, absolutamente nada. Apenas a manutenção do sistema que favorece poucos em detrimento da perda de muitos. 

Uma recente pesquisa feita pela Unicamp mostra que para cada R$ 1,00 arrecadado no Brasil, quase o mesmo valor é desviado por esquemas de superfaturamento, suborno, corrupção, altos salários de funcionalismo público, mordomias. Você realmente acha que Sarney e Temer irão mudar isso? A última década viu assombrosas quebras de recordes nas arrecadações dos bancos. Semestre após semestre, Bradesco, Itaú, HSBC e Santader mostraram somas quase inacreditáveis de lucro. Enquanto o PIB brasileiro estancou entre 4% e 5%, o lucro do Bradesco em 2007 cresceu, por exemplo, 49%. Agora, mesmo com o Governo liberando somas ainda mais significativas e cortando a taxa básica de juros regulamentada pelo Banco Central, o famoso “spread” bancário não abaixa. Não. Os acionistas multimilionários dos bancos não vão perder nenhum centavo para a minha ou a sua relação com a economia. Não espere nada disso no capitalismo.

O incrível filósofo esloveno Slavoj Zizek, em recente passagem pelo Brasil, jorrou pérolas de inteligência e possibilidades para todos os que souberam ouvir suas ríspidas palavras. Zizek, marxista convicto que usa a psicanálise de Jacques Lacan como base de trabalho na cultura popular, é um crítico feroz da corrente místico-idealista que nutre já por tempo demais o modelo neo-liberal que agora sangra em bancarrota. Zizek expõe cruamente a falsidade ideológica de gente como Jack Welch, Alan Greenspan, entre muitos outros, que diziam que o mercado é “sábio e inteligente” por si só. Em determinado momento ele quase implora: “parem de falar apenas da crise, por si só, e vamos pensar em porquê chegamos onde chegamos e como podemos fazer diferente”.

Enquanto estes dois fatos aconteciam isoladamente, um terceiro me chamou a atenção pela sua natureza dantesca. O culto ao “fenômeno”, Ronaldo, agora no Corintians. Para muitos, não se fala em mais nada. Ele parece ser a salvação. Do futebol, da economia, do planeta. Jornalistas tarimbados ao lado dele fazem perguntas cretinas e óbvias. Assistir a uma entrevista de Ronaldo é algo quase hilário, dada a completa falta de articulação e inteligência do atleta fora de forma. Ronaldo poderia até ser o grande jogador de sua geração. Mas não o foi. Desde o fatídico jogo na final da Copa do Mundo, em 1998, contra a França, Ronaldo não significa nada para os que vêem o futebol ainda como um esporte e não apenas mais um negócio capitalista. Mas a maioria dos torcedores brasileiros esquece-se muito facilmente dos fatos. Não somente de Ronaldo, mas dos políticos, de Sarney e Temer, de Collor, de todos eles. Um país sem memória, para o bem e para o mal.

Fazer diferente como Slavoj Zizek pediu. Sim, fazer, pensar, construir, tocar, viver de forma diferente. Será que não está mais do que na hora de mudarmos? De tentar algo novo? Eu não votei em Sarney ou em Temer, pedindo para que eles fossem reeleitos. Eu não os quero lá de novo. Eu não quero saber se hoje Ronaldo comeu feijão, se ele dormiu tarde, se ele já perdeu 2 quilos, ou seja lá o que for. Nem mesmo saber quem são os “novos” logo-mais-esquecidos astros do BBB. Eu não quero mais pagar os juros mais altos do mundo, e ver os bancos quebrarem recordes de lucro. Eu não quero mais ver políticos corruptos impunes. Não. Eu quero fazer diferente. Quero espantar os ratos. Não quero somente as migalhas. E você, quer o quê?

nineinchnails:

Nine Inch Nails: “In Two,” live from the Tension 2013 tour in Los Angeles, 11/08/13. Watch the full-length concert film at nin.com/tension. Expanded version coming to Blu-ray later this year.

The measure of intelligence is the ability to change. — Albert Einstein (via observando)

theatlanticcities:

"On January 30, 1969, London lunch-goers were treated to an unexpected Beatles concert. That remarkable event was made all the more memorable by this — it was the band’s last show together.”

(via theatlantic)

capa da revista Guitar Load, edição #40, janeiro de 2014. Confira a super entrevista de 13 páginas + a revista na íntegra aqui =»> www.guitarload.com.br

capa da revista Guitar Load, edição #40, janeiro de 2014. Confira a super entrevista de 13 páginas + a revista na íntegra aqui =»> www.guitarload.com.br